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Managing Luxury Online

After the New York, London, Paris and Milan Fashion Weeks – which Dazed condenses into some key trends – comes the hard sell. We know that increasingly people are shopping online, not only while in the comfort of their home but also while out and about, with 25% of shoppers on their phone looking at a store’s website at the same time as they are in a physical shop, according to ForeSee. The stats for those luxury demographics bear even more consideration; Luxury Daily recently reported that 20% of those earning $150k p.a. or more shop via their phones.

As usual the Louis Vuitton show in Paris was streamed live online. The brand was one of the leaders in pioneering the idea of making such events available to hoi polloi. While some esoteric fashionistas may turn their noses up at the democratisation of luxury, they are increasingly swimming against the current as such efforts become more commonplace. Mere days after Marc Jacobs had taken his bow at the end of his latest collection for Louis Vuitton, the site fashionshow.louisvuitton.com was alive with myriad content, including in-depth interviews with Jacobs et al. It’s a beautiful microsite and worth checking out. At the weekend Zeitgeist decided to browse the Vuitton website from the comfort of his bed on his iPhone. One of the nice little things about the Louis Vuitton website is that to navigate there, all you need type in is “lv” and you are redirected to the site. Unfortunately, the same cannot be said for the mobile internet, where Zeitgeist was instead directed to a website for car insurance. Not a pleasant experience. It’s all the more important to have bought these keywords for mobile devices when the user will find typing less easy and is also likely to have less time than when they are using a desktop computer. It’s a shame because otherwise Vuitton’s digital presence is above reproach.

Worse still was when Zeitgeist then tried to visit Gucci by typing in “Gucci” into their Safari browser on the iPhone. The Gucci logo appeared and all seemed well until it transpired that he had arrived at the German site. Rookie mistakes like this do a disservice to a brand, and hurt it all the more the more luxurious it is.

On the more impressive side, the always admirable Lanvin, doyenne of Mount Street and invader of Savile Row, has finally launched a European e-commerce site, showcasing, as Luxuo puts it, “Lanvin’s dynamic style, the spirit of Alber Elbaz, and the creative wealth of its collections”. The site as whole manages to convey elegance, insouciance, history and contemporary style. Luxury brands have had a hard time adjusting to the online revolution, uncomfortably wondering how to translate the rarefied atmosphere of a boutique into the world of the Internet. Fashion’s Collective puts it best, in an article on redefining exclusivity,

The answer is to redefine what exclusive means. Rather than exclusive being the clientele the brand attracts, it should instead be the experience the brand conveys. Here, the focus shifts to the brand to provide value online just as they do offline. By curating the images, videos, copy, content and experience a brand publishes online, exclusivity is created.

While others have floundered, Lanvin passes the test with flying colours. Very impressive and very distressing news for the Zeitgeist credit card.

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